Craft book – Little Anns http://little-anns.com/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 05:28:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://little-anns.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/little-120x120.png Craft book – Little Anns http://little-anns.com/ 32 32 A DIY book to review https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-to-review/ Sun, 14 Nov 2021 05:32:56 +0000 https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-to-review/ We have a good selection of craft books in the library, and every year there are many more craft books published. Our customers love these books. I like browsing through handmade “eye candy”, looking at the projects, wondering if I could create something that is far close to the example shown. Sometimes I try one […]]]>


We have a good selection of craft books in the library, and every year there are many more craft books published. Our customers love these books. I like browsing through handmade “eye candy”, looking at the projects, wondering if I could create something that is far close to the example shown. Sometimes I try one of the projects in the book. Rarely do I go back to a given craft book more than a few times. I return the book and let someone else read it.

However, there are a few craft books that are keepers, books that I own because they are so useful and because they are beautiful on their own. Beryl Taylor’s first book, “Mixed Media Explorations” is that type of book.

First of all, the book is packed with information. Sometimes authors come up with lukewarm projects and ideas just to sell another book. That’s not the case here. His first book is full of content.

Second, she demonstrates a variety of techniques. These techniques include binding and incorporating simple stitches into your work. I learned how to make tissue paper – using fabric, fabric, and paint – which resulted in a really cool material. I also learned to incorporate blown paints with taste – not something that looked ridiculously youthful.

Third, the projects are achievable. Often times, you’ll see a new project to try out or a new technique to make early versions worthy of the old Regretsy (a site that displayed crafting and baking failures). It offers concrete projects. While I don’t like projects that leave no room for creativity, his projects leave a lot of room for experimentation and interpretation.

Finally, the projects and illustrations displayed in the color pages are beautiful. His style has been described as a mix of Victoriana and Steampunk. Its colors tend towards romantic pastels that deepen into more intense shades of magenta, plum and merlot – the Victoriana. His compositions begin with simple motifs added together to form a complex whole. All in all, it’s a fun book to check out at least once.

Kira Michaelieu runs some of the adult craft programs at the Missouri River Regional Library.



Source link

]]>
A DIY book that reminds us why we write https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-that-reminds-us-why-we-write/ https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-that-reminds-us-why-we-write/#respond Thu, 19 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-that-reminds-us-why-we-write/ illo for sbtbDavid Wilson for the Boston Globe “I started designing this project in 2017, when I felt like we were going through a very dark political period,” said Charlie Jane Anders. Then came the pandemic, during which she lost her father, who died of COVID in 2020. “Writing can help protect and comfort us […]]]>
illo for sbtbDavid Wilson for the Boston Globe

“I started designing this project in 2017, when I felt like we were going through a very dark political period,” said Charlie Jane Anders. Then came the pandemic, during which she lost her father, who died of COVID in 2020. “Writing can help protect and comfort us during a frightening time,” she said, adding: ” it is also a vulnerable thing to do. And I think it’s important to recognize that.

So now is the right time for a book encouraging its readers to view writing as an act not only of creativity but of survival, not just a way to seek truth but a way to build community. Anders’ “Never Say You Can’t Survive,” which borrows its title from a 1977 Curtis Mayfield song and album, mixes crafting advice with elements of criticism and memory.

Anders, who has won almost all accolades in speculative fiction, says the book is not just for writers of this genre. “The reader I had in mind for my book was someone who isn’t necessarily a professional writer or even an aspiring writer,” she said, “but someone who needs an outlet and who wants to find a way to use the storytelling that we all do in our daily lives to find solace, solace or pleasure.

Writing isn’t just hard work. “The key part of the ‘word game’ is the play,” said Anders. “There is the pleasure of playing with words and making original and distinct sentences and maybe catching someone’s attention in a really fun way.”

Some of her advice was meant for herself, Anders said. “I kind of reassure myself, as a person who was really struggling creatively and personally. I just remember the joy I can get from writing.

Charlie Jane Anders is in conversation with P. Djèlí Clark at 7 p.m. Monday at Porter Square Books.


Kate Tuttle, writer and freelance critic, can be reached at kate.tuttle@gmail.com.


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/a-diy-book-that-reminds-us-why-we-write/feed/ 0
Why Michael deleted a feminist craft book during Women’s History Month https://little-anns.com/why-michael-deleted-a-feminist-craft-book-during-womens-history-month/ https://little-anns.com/why-michael-deleted-a-feminist-craft-book-during-womens-history-month/#respond Tue, 16 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/why-michael-deleted-a-feminist-craft-book-during-womens-history-month/ Feminism doesn’t include a bad word. Or, at least, that’s not the case at Michael’s arts and crafts stores. The New York Times reports that the company, which operates 1,250 stores in the United States and Canada, brought a book promoting feminist arts and crafts from store shelves in February after employees noticed that ‘it […]]]>

Feminism doesn’t include a bad word. Or, at least, that’s not the case at Michael’s arts and crafts stores.

The New York Times reports that the company, which operates 1,250 stores in the United States and Canada, brought a book promoting feminist arts and crafts from store shelves in February after employees noticed that ‘it contained a curse in some of the designs. The book, “Feminist Cross-Stitch,” by Stephanie Rohr, contained forty designs, four of which used obscenity.

The publication reports that two employees noticed the note as they were storing the book, and the incident was reported to company headquarters, which ordered US stores to remove the books and throw them in the trash. . The latter move has sparked outrage in online craft forums, especially because the move took place during Women’s History Month.

“It is our policy not to sell products with the ‘F’ word in or on them in our stores. This is not in line with our brand and this policy will not change, ”the company said in a statement.

Since the backlash, however, the company has reiterated its position on explicit language in the products it sells, but apologized for throwing them in the trash. It also ordered more copies to sell online, with a warning warning those seeking to buy it that obscenities were included.

In addition to Michaels’ website, the book is also sold online at Target, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.

Michael’s isn’t the only arts and crafts retailer to experience backlash over the years, although its main competitor, Hobby Lobby, is often the one that comes under criticism for its beliefs and beliefs. conservative Christian values ​​of its owners. A boycott was called for there after an exhibit in a store urging people to vote for Donald Trump was revealed in September 2020, and the store had to be forcibly closed at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic after the stores remained open because the female founder “received a message from God”.

The retailer, which was deemed non-essential back in the days when only essential businesses were allowed to stay open, ultimately shut down and put employees on leave.

A Michael’s Craft store in Fredericksburg, Virginia is pictured on October 12, 2002. Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/why-michael-deleted-a-feminist-craft-book-during-womens-history-month/feed/ 0
native of Ludington writes quirky craft book for families | New https://little-anns.com/native-of-ludington-writes-quirky-craft-book-for-families-new/ https://little-anns.com/native-of-ludington-writes-quirky-craft-book-for-families-new/#respond Fri, 27 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/native-of-ludington-writes-quirky-craft-book-for-families-new/ Rachel (Jensen) Faucett, inducted into the 2019 Mason County Sports Hall of Fame for Tennis, recently released her own version of a playbook – one for open play. The craft book, “The Handmade Charlotte Playbook,” is a combination of crafting instructions, homemade games, and kid-friendly recipes. Faucett’s parents were elementary school physical education teachers. Her […]]]>

Rachel (Jensen) Faucett, inducted into the 2019 Mason County Sports Hall of Fame for Tennis, recently released her own version of a playbook – one for open play.

The craft book, “The Handmade Charlotte Playbook,” is a combination of crafting instructions, homemade games, and kid-friendly recipes.

Faucett’s parents were elementary school physical education teachers. Her father was a football and tennis coach, and her mother coached gymnastics for schools in the Ludington area. She and her sister were playing tennis. There were a lot of playbooks around.

“Growing up my parents had whistles around their necks,” she said.

So it made sense to call his own book, a guide to creativity, a playbook.

“It was almost an unconscious decision,” she said.

Her family moved to Atlanta, Georgia when she was in 10th grade. She meets her husband Jonathan there.

“There were more opportunities for tennis (in Atlanta). We could play all year, ”she said.

Faucett lives with her husband and five children on a farm in Georgia.

The book is the accumulation of years of experience, 10 years after she and her husband created the children’s craft brand, Handmade Charlotte.

Handmade Charlotte started with children’s clothing. Faucett made clothes for his children and brought the unique pieces to craft fairs. Etsy e-commerce site had just launched and her husband put the items online.

She was trying to find the perfect name for her brand when they went on a ski trip. Her husband pointed to their daughter, just a baby, bundled up in homemade clothes and said, “Look, this is Charlotte handmade!” “

Charlotte, their fourth child, is now 13 years old and proud to be known as “Handmade Charlotte”.

The Handmade Charlotte website, where Faucett wrote blog posts, was meant to support the clothing. When advertisers approached her, she said it made sense to move primarily to DIY content (do it yourself), where crafting instructions are made available for free.

“It started as a blog to connect with other creatives and it turned into DIY,” she said. “We were a small table top manufacturer. It was easier to give the instructions and monetize the website. No matter what went through my mind, I could create, write instructions, and publish on the same day.

Faucett has been invited to write articles for Better Homes & Gardens. Then he was offered the chance to develop a line of children’s clothing for anthropology. She was a Pinterest ambassador at one point.

Handmade Charlotte is now a household name, having developed products for Pottery Barn and featured on Martha Stewart. Handmade Charlotte designs can be found in many big box stores.

“We don’t follow trends, we create trends at Handmade Charlotte,” said Faucett.

Her interest in crafts dates back to her childhood, when she was obsessed with “Make and Do Vol. 9. “

“It was a big part of my childhood. I took all the soap in the house to carve the turtle (in the Childcraft book), ”she said.

Her husband was also into the craft industry, and while writing the Handmade Charlotte book, they debated where the underwater activity was located in the Childcraft book. As it turned out, the version he grew up with was different from his.

Faucett’s aunt is also a “basket weaving mistress” and has influenced her love of arts and crafts.

After Faucett retired as a professional tennis player, having played from 1990 to 1997, she “began to create with the intensity of a professional athlete.”

His vision of “open play” is integrated into the book. With over 100 activities listed alphabetically and by holiday, she said the book was as much about inspiration as it was instruction.

“Open play is important for the development of children’s minds,” she said. “The book is a starting point for this open play experience.”

She stressed that the book is intended to encourage the process of creativity.

“While I was preparing the book, I didn’t want to focus on the end result you see in the photographs. A lot of craft books are like this. I wanted it to be on the process, ”she said. “People may not have all the materials, although I have chosen materials that are easy to find. (And) these people who write the books have been manufacturing for 20 years! I don’t want people to say, ‘I can’t do this, I’m not an artist.’ No! You can do it.”

Faucett said the instructions are clear if people want a perfect trade, but there is value in the early stages and in the middle of making a trade.

“It also helps to move on to the next trade… without finishing the first one,” she said. “Focus on thinking while handling materials. “

It’s the act of fabricating that she wants people to appreciate as much as she can say, “Look what I did! “

“It’s a safe exercise,” she said.

Faucett said the book celebrated Handmade Charlotte’s 10th anniversary. It also comes at a time when people are looking for a creative outlet.

Penguin Random House, who published the book, approached Handmade Charlotte to write it two years ago and it was quite an achievement putting it together. Unlike its website, the content of the book is permanent and cannot be changed.

“I had over 150 projects that I wanted to include,” she said. “We really had to change it.”

The release date has been brought forward due to recent demand for craft books.

“With the global pandemic, people started manufacturing. Pinterest is winning over the pandemic. The editor called and asked if we could get it together sooner, ”she said. “People have time to sit down and tinker. It gives the kids something to do and helps them get bored.

She said that since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, she has noticed that her own children are also creating more.

“We don’t run that much,” she said. “I walked in the other day and my daughter was sitting at the table, handwriting Thanksgiving cards.”

Her eldest is 20 years old and the youngest 10 years old. She said these are all mini versions of her and her husband.

“They are still in a project,” she said.

Since the book came out in October, it has topped the Amazon charts in several categories. A book tour was planned, but it has since been uploaded.

“It’s a different year, a different landscape for publishing a book. We had a 16-20 city book tour that got canceled. With the elections and the pandemic … we want to be sensitive to what’s going on, ”she said.

But the book can provide a bright spot in people’s lives.

“Crafts make people happy,” she said. “It’s a welcome relief in the midst of all the extremes and frightening unknowns.”

She said most of the book’s marketing is done through social media.

“We keep driving,” she said.

When asked to do something for Ludington, either in person at a later date or online, she said she wouldn’t like anything more.

“Ludington is my favorite city,” she said.

While she loves all of the activities in the book, “Swiss cheese,” made from a foam core, could be her # 1.

The “Super Sonic Sound Machine” and “Churro People” are just seconds away.

“You can just flip through it and see what catches your eye,” she said.

Faucett said all of the activities are original projects, although some are variations of classic crafts.

“The options are endless,” she said.

She hopes to continue doing the books, possibly in series, and writing a book on “identifying your own creative process”.

“The Handmade Charlotte Playbook” is on sale at all major bookstores.


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/native-of-ludington-writes-quirky-craft-book-for-families-new/feed/ 0
“The Star Trek Craft Book” is still one of our favorites https://little-anns.com/the-star-trek-craft-book-is-still-one-of-our-favorites-2/ https://little-anns.com/the-star-trek-craft-book-is-still-one-of-our-favorites-2/#respond Sun, 30 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/the-star-trek-craft-book-is-still-one-of-our-favorites-2/ If you’ve always wanted to create your own Tribble, Spock Monkey, Khan Finger Puppet or whatever Star Trek craft, well, you have no more excuses not to do it, especially with the scam season in full swing! Veteran craftsman, author and Star Trek fan Angie Pedersen writes The Star Trek Craft Book, a fun and […]]]>

If you’ve always wanted to create your own Tribble, Spock Monkey, Khan Finger Puppet or whatever Star Trek craft, well, you have no more excuses not to do it, especially with the scam season in full swing! Veteran craftsman, author and Star Trek fan Angie Pedersen writes The Star Trek Craft Book, a fun and authoritative how-to book for creating these and 22 other themed crafts.

The Star Trek Crafting Book is available from Simon & Schuster, and StarTrek.com sewn up a conversation with Pedersen, who walked us through his journey and revealed what fans can expect from his book.

StarTrek.com: First off, can you tell us your story as an author and maker?

Angie Pedersen: I am “multi-craft” which means I do a variety of different trades. My first job was crochet, which my grandmother taught me in 6th grade. Fast forward to 1998, when I started scrapbooking, and that’s where I found my passion. I wrote my first book on scrapbooking in 2002, titled The Book of Me: A Guide to Scrapbooking About Yourself. My second book, Growing Up ME: A Guide to Childhood Story Scrapbooking, was released in 2004. My third book, The Book of US: A Scrapbooking Guide to Relationships, was released in 2005. During these years I also wrote articles for various scrapbooking magazines, and contributed a story to Chicken soup for the soul of the scrapbooker. Scrapbooking also paved the way for other professions such as altered art, mixed media, and art journals. I also do knitting and sewing.

How big is a Star Trek fan are you?

PA: We are a family of Trekkers in the greatest of ways. My husband and I grew up watching CGU, and watched every episode of every new series. Our groom’s cake at our wedding had a Star Trek badge on it. We named our son James T., after Captain Kirk, although the T. stands for “Thomas” rather than “Tiberius”. “Thomas” is actually a nod to Will Riker’s middle name. We also attend the midnight screening of each novelty Star Trek family movie. We visited the Star Trek Experience in Las Vegas a few times and really enjoyed the timeline and the “historical” memories.

How did the opportunity to write the book come about?

PA: I write a weekly article for GeekCrafts.com and my book editor noticed that I mentioned a love of Star Trek in my biography. She emailed me and asked if I would be interested in working on a book project on Star Trek Arts and crafts. I thought that was a trick question, because how could my answer be anything other than “Yes?” “

There are probably hundreds of Trek– related crafts that people could do. How did you narrow the options down to 25 for the book? And how did you go about making the crafting options viable for beginners and experts alike?

PA: My editor and I did a lot of research on the Internet, looking for an assortment of Trek-Inspired by crafting and narrows down projects to include in the book based on variety of crafting techniques and difficulty. We wanted to make sure there were enough different projects for people to try out a range of crafting techniques, while still making it accessible enough for people of all crafting abilities to find something interesting to do. to try.

What do you think the illustrations add?

PA: Step-by-step illustrations help craftspeople have confidence that they are following instructions correctly and that their project will go as planned. They’re especially useful when you’re trying out a new type of crafting and aren’t sure exactly what things are supposed to look like every step of the way.

How much fun did you have designing the different projects and then writing the book?

PA: I had fun thinking and working on the variety of projects; for several months I was able to immerse myself by doing only Star Trek crafts – a geek craftsman’s dream come true. It was so much fun doing the research for the written introductions. Being able to dig deep into the characters and storylines that I already loved so much to connect them to the professions of the book made the project even more fun for me.

How much fun do you hope readers will have by doing the Trek trades described in the book?

PA: I hope the readers have as much fun creating the projects as I do, and that they also enjoy reading the stories of the characters and the episodes. I also hope they enjoy trying new craft techniques that they have never tried before, like decoupage on The animated series coasters or stencilled butcher paper on the tricorder purse.

If you were to follow up on this book, what are some of the things you would like to include in it?

PA: I really wanted to include a Bajoran earring project and something from Borg, like an eyepiece or a miniature cube. I also wanted to make a scarf incorporating Vulcan symbols!


This interview, which originally aired in 2013, has been edited and condensed. The Star Trek Crafting Book is a 176-page paperback that sells for $ 19.99. Click HERE to buy.


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/the-star-trek-craft-book-is-still-one-of-our-favorites-2/feed/ 0
The author of “Library Book” talks about his profession, about book burning https://little-anns.com/the-author-of-library-book-talks-about-his-profession-about-book-burning/ https://little-anns.com/the-author-of-library-book-talks-about-his-profession-about-book-burning/#respond Sun, 02 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/the-author-of-library-book-talks-about-his-profession-about-book-burning/ Book lovers often have a certain respect and love for libraries. Author Susan Orlean is one of this group. Known for books like “The Orchid Thief” and “Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend”, Orleans has a knack for creating compelling stories. His latest, “The Library Book,” delves into the unsolved mystery of the […]]]>

Book lovers often have a certain respect and love for libraries.

Author Susan Orlean is one of this group. Known for books like “The Orchid Thief” and “Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend”, Orleans has a knack for creating compelling stories.

His latest, “The Library Book,” delves into the unsolved mystery of the most disastrous library fire in American history. On April 29, 1986, a fire at the Los Angeles Public Library destroyed over 400,000 books and damaged 700,000 more. In the information age, “The Library Book” seems to have struck a chord with readers and critics alike.

On Tuesday, December 4, Orleans will visit the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs to discuss their new book with Saratoga Springs Public Library Director Isaac Pulver.

The Gazette caught up with her to talk about book burning, the community importance of libraries and some of the quirky characters she met while researching “The Library Book.”

Question: How did you start to write?
A: I think from the moment I was able to write, I wrote. I felt, even when I was very young, that it was a kind of magical power to be able to write and make sentences and make people imagine something different from what they were looking at. So from a young age I wrote little books for my parents and always loved writing homework in school. Then when I graduated from college I had this kind of fantasy of being a professional writer without any special knowledge of how you go about it. I got lucky with a job at a small startup magazine and that’s it. The minute I was able to start writing, I never looked back.

Question: You have written tons of articles and several books [since then]. The subjects you write about are sometimes unusual and [sometimes] very serious. How did you come up with the idea for “The Library Book”?
A: I was at the library one day and just started to think about the benefit of libraries [and] that I didn’t really know what went on in the daily life of a library. So it kinda banged in my head for a while and then when I heard about the fire I thought it was such a remarkable and fascinating story. It gave me a portal to write this bigger story about libraries in general.

Question: How did you start your research for this?
A: Well, I had to learn everything. I was new to LA so I needed to learn a lot about the city and its history. I really started off in several directions, just trying to read as much as I could about the fire itself, but at the same time I started to learn the history of the library and in addition the history of the growth of the city because they were so closely linked. But I was starting from scratch and all of my research began recognizing how little I knew about the subject and really starting from scratch.

Question: During your research, you have come across a lot of interesting characters. Can you tell me about some?
A: Some of the people I most enjoyed meeting weren’t alive if that counts. There were so many characters in the history of the library that I fell in love with, including several of the former chief librarians, especially around the turn of the century. There was a truly eccentric and brilliant man named Charles Lummis who was one of the most extraordinary figures I have ever written about. [He] was a book enthusiast, a bit self-centered and narcissistic and a showman but also a true genius. He ran the library for five years and really made his mark in more ways than one. He made a branding iron, like the kind of iron you would use to brand cattle, and he marked books that he didn’t think were worth reading as a way of saying “We’re going to keep this in. the library because we own it and it’s part of our collection, but it’s not a book I recommend you read. ‘ It was quite funny.

Question: So he was partly conservative, telling people, “You can ignore this one. “
A: Yeah, absolutely. He had very strong feelings about what your experience in a library should be like and that included directing you to the books he found useful and stepping away from those he didn’t approve of. He was just a very extraordinary figure and, in the same way, I really adore the current director of the library, who is a very human, empathetic and inspiring guy. [He] sort of embodies what I consider to be what libraries do best, which is [provide] a sense of community, knowledge and sharing in which everyone can participate.

Question: Another aspect of your research involved book burning. What are some of the things you learned during this part of the research? Was this part disturbing?
A: It was very disturbing. I became familiar with the long and unfortunate history of book and library engraving dating back to pretty much the dawn of time. The number of books in history that have been burnt for political reasons is truly astonishing. World War II, in particular, was quite devastating for libraries around the world. Some of these libraries were set on fire because they were in bombed-out cities, but many of them were singled out and torched in particular by the German military who sought to erase entire cultures from the consciousness of the world. and that meant not only killing people but destroying people, but destroying the books which represented the culture.

Question: You mentioned that you also did your own book burning.
A: I have decided to burn a book myself in part to find out why it is so repugnant to us. It was something I found quite horrible to do even though I knew I could replace a book fairly easily. I did that too because I was going to describe the destruction of this library and realized that I had never seen a book burn. If I were to write this vivid description, it would help if I could know what it looked like. But it was very difficult to bring myself to do it. It was really something that made me uncomfortable and I thought it was really interesting that the taboo was very real.

Question: What book did you burn?
A: I engraved a copy of “Fahrenheit 451”.
Question: Do you think a lot of people in the US realize how much libraries mean and Google really can’t replace places like these, especially because they’re physical institutions?
A: I think you expressed it perfectly. Libraries are not just a storehouse of books, they have all kinds of resources and they are a physical place and it’s an irreplaceable part of what they offer, which is that public place where information is shared, celebrated. and broadcast. Moreover, not everything is online. While it is certainly true that many and many things are, it is also very true that there are many that are not online and that there is value in encountering material in the flesh that libraries make it possible.

Question: Do you think people, especially the younger generations, are realizing this?
A: Well, library visits, in general, are on the rise and polls show people under the age of 30 back the claim that there is a lot in the library that is not available on the internet. So in a way, it’s the opposite of what you would expect. Younger people seem to be well aware that there is a lot that is not online.

Question: When you were a child, what was your favorite library and which [are] some of your best memories from there?
A: My favorite library was my branch library near my home when I was young. It is the one to which I have the most sentimental attachment. I grew up in a suburb of Cleveland and it was a library branch near my home. I just have countless memories, I couldn’t even choose my favorite because I went there so often. It was really part of my life. . . every visit felt like the best visit.

Question: With “The Orchid Thief” there was a film adaptation. Any interest in [adapting] this one?
A: Yes, it will be adapted for television.

Question: What book are you reading now?
A: I am finishing “The Witch Elm” by Tana French and I have just finished “Washington Black” by Esi Edugyan.

Susan Orlean will be at the Northshire Bookstore (424 Broadway, Saratoga Springs) on Tuesday. Starting at 6 pm, she will discuss “The Library Book” with Issac Pulver, the director of the Saratoga Springs public library. Tickets cost $ 5. For more information, visit northshire.com.

More from The Daily Gazette:

Categories: Entertainment


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/the-author-of-library-book-talks-about-his-profession-about-book-burning/feed/ 0
A new profession: folding books | Outlook https://little-anns.com/a-new-profession-folding-books-outlook/ https://little-anns.com/a-new-profession-folding-books-outlook/#respond Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/a-new-profession-folding-books-outlook/ Books have more uses than they appear. Of course, you can put the pretty ones as decoration, you can read the damn things. But have you tried turning a book into a three-dimensional sculpture? The process can be quite simple; the result, a beautiful conversation piece. There are many permutations of book folding, an art […]]]>

Books have more uses than they appear. Of course, you can put the pretty ones as decoration, you can read the damn things. But have you tried turning a book into a three-dimensional sculpture?

The process can be quite simple; the result, a beautiful conversation piece.

There are many permutations of book folding, an art form of folding the pages of a hardcover book – sometimes in combination with cutting the paper – into the book’s own binding. The finished work comes off the page in three dimensions and can be hung on the wall or placed on a table. Groups of three or more are the most dynamic.

“They look awesome on the wall,” says Candice Caldwell of Chicago. “A group of six of them on the wall can be very beautiful, and they are just very simple folds.”

Caldwell, who blogs about reusing everyday items such as books in “ReFab journals,” was turning old books into clocks when, in 2003, she saw a simple project to fold books into a magazine. DIY and tried it.

She has since taught several friends and her mother how to fold books into wall art. “It’s very, very forgiving,” Caldwell says.

Clare Youngs, author of Folded book art, also says that folding books is easy. His book includes instructions for folding a butterfly and other designs.

“It sounds complicated and impractical, but it’s really easy to do,” Youngs said in an email from his home in Kent, England. “You don’t tell anyone how easy it is and they’ll be amazed at your creations.”

Find book folding tutorials on YouTube (Johwey Redington’s “Introductory Book Sculpture Leson” is a good program) and on creative blogs – Caldwell shares links to many useful sites. Instructables, the website that lists how-tos on homes, crafts, and tech, shares a three-step tutorial.

You can also order patterns online. Designs include animals, geometric designs, numbers and inspirational words, and designs and finished pieces are sold at Etsy.com.

“My mouth is always wide open when I find these people (like the Crizu artists),” Martin says. “I can’t get over the creativity that people have for a simple old book. They do something completely different with it.”

Youngs started folding pages into art several years ago when she saw images of crafts online on Pinterest. She watched a few tutorials on YouTube before putting her daughter’s age in a book.

“It’s quite a therapeutic activity,” Youngs says. “You get into a scoring and folding rhythm that is relaxing, and it’s very satisfying to watch the form develop.”

Martin has a quick comeback for those who think folding books is an act of destruction.

“Let’s be realistic here. Sometimes the old books are better suited for a new purpose,” says Martin. “I think it’s OK to go ahead and take that old unused book that’s going to be thrown out anyway and turn it into a work of art.”


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/a-new-profession-folding-books-outlook/feed/ 0
Book Review: The Tao of Crafts https://little-anns.com/book-review-the-tao-of-crafts/ https://little-anns.com/book-review-the-tao-of-crafts/#respond Fri, 30 Dec 2016 08:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/book-review-the-tao-of-crafts/ The Tao of Crafts: Fu Talismans and Casting Sigils in the Eastern Esoteric Tradition by Benebell Wen. Published by North Atlantic Books (600 pages) The Tao of Handicrafts, by Benebell Wen (also author of Holistic Tarot), is an English-language practitioner’s guide to Chinese 符 (fú). 符 is generally translated as “talisman,” but Wen chooses to […]]]>

The Tao of Crafts: Fu Talismans and Casting Sigils in the Eastern Esoteric Tradition by Benebell Wen.
Published by North Atlantic Books (600 pages)

The Tao of Handicrafts, by Benebell Wen (also author of Holistic Tarot), is an English-language practitioner’s guide to Chinese 符 (fú). 符 is generally translated as “talisman,” but Wen chooses to use the word “seal”, which more specifically captures the use of written texts, of glyphs and symbols, the ritual charge of these designs and their relation both to spiritual work and directly obtaining the desired practical results.

Wen also chooses to use the term “craft” rather than “magic”. The lines between “magic” and “religion” have always been blurred, and although she acknowledges that the vast web of traditions comprising Taoism are often religious, Wen argues that the metaphysical principles underlying the techniques Fú they themselves can operate from a variety of religious settings. . Since “magic” has acquired a more diffuse meaning in expressions such as “magical thinking”, “craftsmanship” more specifically emphasizes the importance of technique and practice. Wen herself chooses to keep the religious language of Buddhism and Taoism in her personal practice, while seeking to understand the underlying principles.

I didn’t have time to create and use Fú Seals with the guidance in this book, which naturally limits the usefulness of this review for practitioners, although Wen’s primary focus is teaching theory. rather than specific methodologies (instructions for making seals are well included, however). Nevertheless, the issue of cultural context and the interchangeability of techniques is an important issue to consider even before using the techniques themselves. Wen is of Taiwanese descent and devotes an entire chapter to “A Historical and Cultural Background,” but his familiarity with Chinese culture permeates the entire book.

In the wide range of Chinese ontological perspectives, Wen subscribes to the framework of 阴 (yīn) and 阳 (yáng) rather than that of benevolent and malevolent spirits, although the two are related: for example, the “Classics of the Esoteric Talisman , ”Dating from the Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE) although believed to have its origin much earlier, states that the benevolent and heavenly spirits are invoked through“ trigger mechanisms ”using yáng energy, while the ghosts and demons are summoned by yīn energy.

While I certainly agree with Wen that certain magical techniques work across cultures, I also believe that many techniques are enhanced by personal relationships with spirits or deities or other powers that assist in the development. job. The first thing I did when I received the book was go to the index and find and copy the Fú seal invoking the Guan Dao, the weapon of the god Guan Di, to whom I am above all sworn.

A Taoist seal Fú.  Public domain.

A Taoist seal Fú. [Public Domain]

However, both perspectives are rooted in the shared cultural continuum of a living tradition, and when discussing work with spirits and gods, Wen provides instructions regarding appropriate offerings to be made and ritual actions to be performed, including including the setting up of domestic altars, binary divination with the spirits. , and the consecration of statues of deities (开 光, kāiguāng, “opening of light”). For lay people, the consecration of statues would usually be done by a priest, but Wen suggests that serious practitioners (i.e., professionals) of the craft should perform their own consecrations.

One of the first precepts of the Classics of the esoteric talisman is for the practitioner to align with the sky: in most Taoist magical lineages, there would be a specific deity (s) affiliated with that lineage, but Wen allows the possibility of aligning with the Dao itself or with “A higher consciousness”. Whatever divinity or power, she writes, “this sense of greater alignment is imperative in creating.” This need is often reflected in the methodology itself.

A traditional method of using a Fú seal, which is found in a traditional spell to earn money by invoking the god of wealth Zhao Gong Ming (another deity that I worship daily in my personal practice ), consists of burning the paper, mixing the ashes with wine and drinking the resulting concoction. And as I was also taught, even after performing the spell, “One of the warnings regarding Zhao Gong Ming’s blessings is that the recipient of his blessings must work hard and lead a diligent and modest life. So, in this case, magic is not a substitute for religious devotion, but a complement to it.

The Tao of Handicrafts is itself a well-crafted and well-researched book (with many endnotes), clearly grounded in personal experience and practice, and rooted in Chinese culture. Practitioners of all kinds of magical and / or religious traditions would do well to follow Wen’s lead, especially if they plan to incorporate Chinese spiritual work or magical technologies into their work. Respect for tradition and for the spirits and powers of tradition is crucial.

To this end, Wen includes an excellent chapter on cultural appropriation. Wen acknowledges that some sects believe that “only an ordained priest or a priestess of a recognized Taoist lineage can create a Fu seal,” but the truth is that there is no real application. in Chinese communities on this issue either: fraud and corruption are problems, although of course this is not an excuse or justification for non-Chinese individuals to commit their own thefts. Regarding cultural appropriation, Wen writes:

Making Fu Seals in the context of any serious magical tradition is not cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation occurs if Fu is treated as decorative ornamentation or if the practice is not viewed with the same reverence that a practitioner would treat similar practices in their own tradition.

If one does not practice a serious tradition that treats its practices with reverence, it might be something to rectify before interfering with the traditions of others, especially given the historical background of Western imperialism and colonialism.

Wen also includes an extremely personal reflection on the question of authenticity, the question of whether she, as an Asian American, is “Asian enough” to write such a book. To be honest, I had similar questions after agreeing to write this review. Wen offers the helpful reminder that “esoteric texts are just that – esoteric. Full literacy didn’t help much if you weren’t from a background rooted in crafts.

Wen’s familiarity with Western occult traditions therefore gives him certain advantages in his own work with the Fú sigils, just as his (and my) linguistic limitations come with obvious drawbacks. The essence of craftsmanship, Wen argues, is not to copy the designs of other practitioners and traditions, but to think carefully “how you will apply metaphysical principles and laws to better manifest your intentions,” all by showing respect for the divine, the human and the non-human. human relations.

* * *

The views and opinions expressed by our diverse panel of columnists and guest writers represent the many divergent perspectives within the global pagan, pagan and polytheistic communities, but do not necessarily reflect the views of The Wild Hunt Inc. or its direction.


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/book-review-the-tao-of-crafts/feed/ 0
51 things to do with cardboard boxes • Create a green world https://little-anns.com/51-things-to-do-with-cardboard-boxes-create-a-green-world/ https://little-anns.com/51-things-to-do-with-cardboard-boxes-create-a-green-world/#respond Fri, 04 Nov 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/51-things-to-do-with-cardboard-boxes-create-a-green-world/ My kids and I really love this Quarto craft book series, the most recent of which (still on pre-order for you, but safe and sound in our warm little hands!) Is 51 Things To Do With Cardboard Boxes . Like the other books in the 51 Things series, this book focuses on projects that children, […]]]>

My kids and I really love this Quarto craft book series, the most recent of which (still on pre-order for you, but safe and sound in our warm little hands!) Is 51 Things To Do With Cardboard Boxes .

Like the other books in the 51 Things series, this book focuses on projects that children, sometimes with the help of adults, can do from things that are easy to find around the house. Unlike 51 Things to Do With Cardboard Tubes, however, the projects in this cardboard box book can be a bit more complicated, because unlike cardboard tubes, cardboard boxes come in an endless variety of shapes and sizes. of sizes. Therefore, it’s best to 1) know exactly what project you want to create, and then be on the lookout for boxes that match that project, or 2) come to the book with a bunch of boxes ready, and be ready to create n whatever project matches what you have.

But if you’ve got the boxes for it, you’ll again find a bunch of different projects to use them on, and surely something for any kid. Kids who love animal crafts can make giraffes, crocodiles, fish, butterflies, tigers and more – this one has LOTS of animal crafts! Kids who like to pretend play will enjoy the Pirate Hat, Treasure Chest, Castle, and Pirate Ship. Children who want to dress up can make glasses, a robot mask, or a bracelet. And although this book has fewer Christmas decorations than the cardboard tube craft book, you can still make a Christmas tree or a reindeer.

The additional supplies you will need are fairly minimal, usually consisting of paint or colored paper. Googly eyes are always a plus, and a few tutorials ask for straws, an offer I don’t like but generally have great success with replacing with sticks.

Photo credit: image 51 things to do with cardboard boxes via Quarto

I received a free copy of 51 things to do with cardboard boxes, because I can’t write on a book unless it encourages me to take ALL of my things out of their original packaging.


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/51-things-to-do-with-cardboard-boxes-create-a-green-world/feed/ 0
Barbara’s ‘Bahamian Straw Craft’ Book and Bags Gain Fans with First Lady and Governor General https://little-anns.com/barbaras-bahamian-straw-craft-book-and-bags-gain-fans-with-first-lady-and-governor-general/ https://little-anns.com/barbaras-bahamian-straw-craft-book-and-bags-gain-fans-with-first-lady-and-governor-general/#respond Fri, 06 Nov 2015 08:00:00 +0000 https://little-anns.com/barbaras-bahamian-straw-craft-book-and-bags-gain-fans-with-first-lady-and-governor-general/ Last update: Feb 13 2017 – 01:45:37 First Lady Bernadette Christie receives a copy of “Bahamian Straw Craft” from straw designer Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham Nassau, Bahamas – Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling and First Lady Bernadette Christie are the latest fans of the work of straw bag designer and author Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham. The two remarkable women […]]]>
Last update: Feb 13 2017 – 01:45:37



First Lady Bernadette Christie receives a copy of “Bahamian Straw Craft” from straw designer Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham



Nassau, Bahamas – Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling and First Lady Bernadette Christie are the latest fans of the work of straw bag designer and author Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham. The two remarkable women recently caught up with Ms. Knowles-Jesubatham to learn more about her new book “Bahamian Straw Craft: A Guide to Making Native Straw Bags”, a first-of-its-kind teaching on creating iconic Bahamian straw bags. Proud “daughter” of Long Island, Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham is passionate about her art. She has won numerous awards for her authentic creations at the Bahamas International Cultural Festival, has been recognized as a “living legend” by the Zonta Club of New Providence and has even had one of her exquisite creations presented to Queen Elizabeth II. . Ms. Knowles-Jesubatham wrote her book in the hopes of passing this Indigenous art on to the next generation. She will be hosting her next book signing at the Spanish Wells Food Fair on November 13-14.

Photo-2_2.jpg

(ld) J. Ravi Jesubatham, Honorary Consul, Sri Lanka; Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling, with a bespoke bag from Barbara’s Straw Designs; Barbara Knowles-Jesubatham, straw designer and author.





Bookmark and Share

© Copyright 2015 by thebahamasweekly.com

Top of page


Source link

]]>
https://little-anns.com/barbaras-bahamian-straw-craft-book-and-bags-gain-fans-with-first-lady-and-governor-general/feed/ 0